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Sailfin molly

Stocking Fish Tips: Slowly acclimate fish to your current setup or preferrably a quarantine tank. When bringing home new fish, dump the bag contents (fish and water) into a clean (used only for fish) 5-gallon bucket and then add about 1 cup of aquarium water to the 5 gallon bucket every 10 minutes. Continue to add 1 cup of aquarium water to the 5-gallon bucket every 10 minutes. After an hour or so your fish should be ready to add to the aquarium.
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The sailfin molly, Poecilia latipinna, is a species of fish, of the genus Poecilia. They inhabit fresh, brackish, and coastal waters from North Carolina to Texas and the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico.

The sailfin molly was originally described in 1821 as Mollienesia latipinna by the naturalist Charles Alexandre Lesueur. Lesueur based his description upon specimens from freshwater ponds in the vicinity of New Orleans, Louisiana. However, Lesueur described other collections of the sailfin molly as Mollienesia multilineata in 1821, the same year in which he described M. latipinna. This conflict created confusion and eventually necessitated a ruling by the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature (ICZN). In 1959, the ICZN placed precedence on the name Mollienesia latipinna Lesueur 1821. In a landmark definitive work on Poeciliid fishes, Donn Rosen and Reeve Bailey (1959) noted the priority of Poecilia by Marcus Elieser Bloch and Johann Gottlob Schneider (1801) with regards to Mollienesia by Lesueur (1821), thereby relegating Mollienesia to the synonymy of Poecilia.

Sailfin molly (English), Breitflossenkärpfling (German), Seilfinnemolly (Norwegian), Zeilvinkarper Dutch, Molinezja szerokopletwa (Polish), bubuntis (Tagalog), and molliénésie á voilure or simply “molly voile” (French).

There is some confusion with the Yucatan molly, P. velifera. While most names that contain a “sail” element refer to the present species, the German “Segelkärpfling”, the Latin velifera and possibly others are used for the Yucatan molly. The French terms are used for both species indiscriminately.

The sailfin molly is found in fresh, brackish, and coastal salt water in coastal lowland habitats from North Carolina to Texas and the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico. Preferring marshes, lowland streams, swamps, and estuaries, the sailfin molly is very common in peninsular Florida. Non-indigenous populations are established in New Zealand, in the western U.S. and in Hawaii.[1] Sailfin mollies introduced to California[2] have caused a decline in populations of the Federally protected and endangered Desert Pupfish (Cyprinodon macularius).[3][4]