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Bronze corydoras

Feeding Your Fish Tips: Give your fish a variety of tropical fish food and not just flakes. Read the nutritional information on the canister of food to see what vitamins and minerals your fish is getting. Flakes can be the primary diet for many fish because they are packed with the vitamins and minerals your fish needs. However, try to supplement their diet with other types of food every once in a while. You should see better colors and increased vitality by varying their diet.
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The bronze corydoras (Corydoras aeneus), bronze catfish, lightspot corydoras or wavy catfish is a tropical freshwater fish in the “armored catfish” (Callichthyidae) family. It is widely distributed in South America on the eastern side of the Andes, from Colombia and Trinidad to the Río de la Plata basin.[1] They were originally described as Hoplosoma aeneum by Theodore Gill in 1858 and have also been referred to as Callichthys aeneus.[1]

The adult size is 6½ cm for males and a slightly larger 7 cm for females (2½ to 2¾ inches). Their average lifespan is 10 years. It has a yellow or pink body, white belly, and is blue-grey over its head and back. Its fins are yellow or pink and immaculate. In common with most Corydoras the dorsal, pectoral and adipose fins have an additional sharp barb and have a mild poison which causes fish which try to attack them to get stung. A brownish-orange patch is usually present on the head, just before the dorsal fin, and is its most distinctive feature when viewed from above in the stream.

Like many other catfishes, females are larger than males in this species.[2]

They are found in quiet, shallow waters with soft bottoms that can sometimes be heavily polluted by clouds of disturbed mud from the bottom, but it also inhabits running waters.[1] In its native habitat, it inhabits waters with a temperature range of 25 °C to 28 °C (77 °F to 82 °F), pH 6.0-8.0, and hardness 5 to 19 DGH.[1] Like most members of the Corydoras genus, these catfish have a unique method of coping with the low oxygen content that prevails in such environments. In addition to utilizing their gills like any other fish, they can by come to the surface of the water and draw air in through their mouth. This air is then absorbed through the wall of the intestine and any surplus air is expelled through the vent.[1] It typically stays in schools of 20 to 30 individuals.[1] It feeds on worms, benthic crustaceans, insects, and plant matter.[1]

Reproduction occurs with the onset of the rainy season, which changes the water chemistry.[1] Females spawn 10–20 egg-clutches with multiple males at a time, but an entire egg clutch is inseminated by sperm of a single male.[2]

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