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Barramundi

Fish Tank Maintenance Tips: Always turn off the electricity before working in or around your tank. Use a powerstrip connected to a gfci outlet and all you have to do to turn off the electricity is flip a switch. Also, use drip loops on all of the cords or hang the power strip on the wall, thereby causing the cords to loop before reaching the plug in. Read the aquarium electrical safety article.

Contents of this page belong to www.fishlookup.com The Barramundi (Lates calcarifer) is a species of catadromous fish in family Latidae of order Perciformes. The native species is widely distributed in the Indo-West Pacific region from the Persian Gulf, through Southeast Asia to Papua New Guinea and Northern Australia.

Barramundi is a loanword from a Queenslander Australian language of the Rockhampton area[1] meaning “large-scaled river fish”.[2] Originally, the name barramundi referred to saratoga and Gulf saratoga.[3] However, the name was appropriated for marketing reasons during the 1980s, a decision which has aided in raising the profile of this fish significantly.[3]

L. calcarifer is also known as the giant perch, giant seaperch, Asian seabass, Australian seabass, white seabass, and by a variety of names in other local languages, such as Siakap in Malay. It is nicknamed the silver jack.

Barramundi are a salt and freshwater sportfish, targeted by many. They have large silver scales, which may become darker or lighter, depending on their environment. Their bodies can reach up to 1.8 meters long, though evidence of them being caught at this size is scarce.

Barramundi are mainly a summertime fish, but can be caught all year round, and may be found frolicking in mud. They are usually caught using hard-bodied lures and bait.

The barramundi feeds on crustaceans, molluscs, and smaller fishes (including its own species); juveniles feed on zooplankton. This catadromous species inhabits rivers and descends to estuaries and tidal flats to spawn. At the start of the monsoon, males migrate downriver to meet females, who lay very large numbers of eggs (multiple millions each). The adults do not guard the eggs or the fry, which require brackish water to develop. The species is sequentially hermaphroditic, most individuals maturing as males and becoming female after at least one spawning season; most of the larger specimens are therefore female.